Management that Matters

She works in a bar and grill at Oak Island during the summer while she is out on college break. Mike and I had recently met her there. I learned that she previously worked at a local restaurant. Mike and I had been to that restaurant for dinner the night before this conversation. It is one of my favorite restaurants on the island. So, it was interesting to get her perspective on her previous employer. Her statements said it all.

“I loved working there. The owners are great to their staff.” I could tell that she meant it.  Her comments reminded me of similar comments from another person at a different restaurant a few months previously. That person said, “I love this job! It’s a nice place to work. The people I work for show you recognition and appreciation. They have a great team. I like my supervisor and my manager.”

If you are in a management position, would the people who report to you say these things about you? Would they think that you provide them with appreciation and recognition? Or, are the staff just a cog in the wheel to you? If the latter is true, the staff who report to you know it. They would not volunteer the positive comments that these two staff members of different restaurants said about their management.

Management should be more about leadership than management. Management is about control, and while some control is necessary, one thing we should not want or need to control is people. People cannot do their best work when they feel controlled. Management should be more about Leadership than Management. Leadership is about inspiring others to be their best and to do their best work. And when it is, you will have others commending your management of them, without you even being aware of the conversations.

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Printed 20 years ago! Obviously, this subject is near and dear to my heart. 

Perhaps you are not in a management position, other than you are the manager of your home and family. How do your children feel appreciated and recognized? Are your words encouraging or deflating? Do you speak in a confident yet caring tone of voice, or do you yell? Do your words and your actions inspire them to be and do their best? The principles that are important in the home are the same principles that are important in the workplace.

Regardless of your management and leadership position, never forget that those who depend on you know best how well you are doing the job of showing them appreciation and recognition, of inspiring them to be and do their best. They also know when you don’t.

 

Patti name

 

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About Patti Fralix

Patti Fralix inspires positive change in work, life, and family through Speaking, Consulting, and Coaching in three specialty areas: Leadership, Managing Differences, and Customer Service. Her leadership firm, The Fralix Group, Inc., has been helping clients achieve practical and tangible results for twenty-two years.
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2 Responses to Management that Matters

  1. Patti, you hit the nail on the head. Butch managed a lot of people in the steel industry and years later we often see former employees who say he was the best manager they ever worked for. Words such as encouragement, caring, respect, and appreciation are used in describing his skills. He always valued his team and that is so important. I always enjoy your posts dear friend.

  2. Patti Fralix says:

    Thank you, dear Pam. I am not surprised at all that Butch is a great manager. He has that personality, much like my Mike. Thanks so much for reading my musings and commenting. Have a wonderful weekend.

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